Your chance to get involved in Inclusion Week — Better Lives for People in Leeds

September, the month when lots of innovative events and activities get started, here is one not to miss……..book your place. be sure you are included. Reblogged from Better Lives Leeds

Inclusion Week runs from 26 September until 2 October and there will be a LOT going on in and around Leeds. On Tuesday 26th September, Leeds City Council is hosting ‘Innovation through diversity’, a conference to better understand and explore opportunities of being a more culturally diverse city. From 1 -4.30pm at Leeds Civic Hall, speakers will include Sharon […]

via Your chance to get involved in Inclusion Week — Better Lives for People in Leeds

New Year goals for AIM Education, Leeds

Goals and aims for New Year.

The Aim Education Organisation’s mission statement is

“Creating opportunities to overcome inequalities and enrich local communities.”

In furthering their objectives the  Aim Education Organisation had already by November 2014 set their goals for this New Year, one of them being a 24 hour continuous!….yes continuous!…..five-a-side football match.

They had already in November set and completed the organisations first challenge, and what a challenge it was, an overnight trek around the 80 mile boundary of Leeds. One participant Jonny Wooton described it as “agony and ecstasy”, here is his account of the event.

Leeds Trek 2014

“The inaugural event of Leeds Trek in November 2014, was an 80 mile overnight trek of agony and ecstasy! The aim of the event was to raise funds, which would be used to help re-engage children in Leeds who have become disengaged from school.

AT 7.00AM on Saturday November 24, 20 brave individuals embarked on a historic walk around Leeds. The grueling 80 miles challenge started in the centre of Leeds, and reached as far as the Cow and Calf rocks on Ilkley Moor. The trek was the first (hopefully of many) Aim Education Organisation’s, Leeds Trek.intend to arrange.

As the walkers hiked between Leeds centre towards Roundhay Park, it was our four-legged friend Alan, a border terrier that flew out of the traps to set the pace until checkpoint one. As the walkers fast-approached the second checkpoint at Thorner, Alan retired for the day,  but  the tight-knit group of trekkers kept up their spirits as they battled their way through the mist. Once they reached the lovely village of Thorner, they received a warm welcome of  excellent coffee and croissants at The Beehive. At this point some walkers had developed blisters and were having plasters and tape applied.to them. Despite the discomfort trekkers experienced the overall goal of raising funds for Aim Education remained a powerful incentive to carry them onward.

Harewood House(Some of the Trekkers outside Harewood House)

Harewood House was the next checkpoint and our trekkers adrenaline was now flowing. En-route to their next stage at Otley Chevin they soldiered on through a light shower of rain . Along the way new friendships were being made, the oldest competitor John, 73, was building a rapport with Sean, just 17.

The event was the brainchild pf Aim Education’s Head of Program, Carl Harrison. Carl had positioned himself in the centre of the group of trekkers, and from there was able to encourage each competitor.  Carl’s message about the aim and importance of the event was loud and clear …..we had to finish! Our success would help to re-engage children who had become disengaged from West Leeds schools, allowing them the opportunity to get back on track via Aim Education’s program.

The Cow and Calf was reached at 10pm, at this point the whole group could now see that completing the ultra-marathon challenge was becoming a real possibility.
Despite the darkness, our spirits remained high, as we passed through Guiseley, Horsforth and Headingly hunger pangs started to kick in. Meanwhile in the early hours, AIM’s administrator Babs was preparing a splendid Chicken Casserole dish, this was for the teams later arrival at AIM’s HQ, St Thomas’ Community Centre in Stanningley.

Morley(Morley with Jenny May and mum at 5.00am)
Our 5a.m. food stop was in Morley, where Jenny and her kind-hearted mum were on hand with hot drinks and some scrumptious snacks, which loaded trekkers full of the necessary carbohydrates to help see them through until the final checkpoint.
The final stop was at the Brown Cow in Temple Newsam, where the walking weary were given by way of a final ‘push,’ some words of encouragement from Pauline Grahame,  Councillor for Cross Gates and Whinmoor.
The last leg of the trek was undoubtedly the hardest but contestants ploughed on to complete the 80 miles Leeds Trek to Leeds Sports Centre, and were greeted by rapturous applause!
AIM Education would like to thank all the pubs, centres and kind individuals that helped them along the way. Planning is already underway for the 2015 event.  Word on the street is that it may be a 24hr continuous five-a-side football match. If you are interested in getting involved and want to help raise funds to make Leeds a better place both now and in the future please contact Carl Harrison on 07581883160 or email him at carlharrison@aimeducation.co.uk

For information about AIM Education please contact our centre at St Thomas’ Church Hall, Stanningley, Leeds, LS28 6NG or call 01132554342

Acupuncture at Phoenix Health and Wellbeing centre

 

Daniel Tavet

Yin-yang  Daniel Tavet

Phoenix Health and Wellbeing in Leeds city centre provide alternative treatments such as various massages, aromatherapy and acupuncture. Acupuncture is a very ancient form of treatment. Traditionally, the Chinese believe our bodies have an energy force called ch’i (pronounced ‘chee’) or qi. Ch’i runs through the body in channels called meridians. These meridians can become blocked either through excessive yang energy – an energy that creates activity, or excessive yin energy – an energy that creates passivity.  An excess in either yang or yin is the result of certain thoughts and actions. The excess can cause mental and/or physical illnesses and more minor conditions.   It is believed that applying the acupuncture needles in specific points on the body stimulates the meridians which then un-block.  The needles are thin and sometimes people don’t feel them when they are applied or just after application.  The acupuncturist at Phoenix explained that in China, acupuncture is a communal treatment, many people will be treated in the same room at once. On Wednesdays Phoenix treat three people simultaneously in their Community Acupuncture clinic.

The staff at Phoenix were very pleasant and friendly.  The acupuncturist asked about my health and how much sleep I get, then I got on the bed which was like a more comfortable version of the type you see at a conventional doctor’s.  There was relaxing classical music playing in the background.  The acupuncturist and a trainee took my pulse.  A needle was placed in each elbow and a few were put in my lower legs.  I was often asked if I felt comfortable and okay.  I did.  I was then told to simply relax and I shut my eyes for about fifteen minutes.  I felt some pleasant sensations in my arms.  By the time the needles were removed, I felt very relaxed, almost to the point of drowsiness.  The acupuncturist said I could relax for a little longer before leaving.

When I left the room, the receptionist asked if I was alright and gave me a glass of water. The acupuncturist said to keep hydrated with hot drinks.  I was asked if I would come again, I definitely would.

Phoenix also provide counselling and support to people with mental and/or physical health issues.

By Daniel Tavet

Leeds Abbey Dash 10k race -16th November

leeds abbey dash

 

MJD_8724

Age UK organise the above event annually, they are inviting you take part. Of this year’s event they say,

“This is the 29th year the Dash has taken place and it has grown to have 12,000 runners taking part this year and is the last event in the Run Britain Grand Prix Series.

The Abbey Dash is number 9 in Men’s Running’s top 10k races, and is now considered ‘one of the best events in the UK!’ The course is flat and fast, creating a great atmosphere for both beginners and advanced participants.

Money raised from the event will help to support older people in both the Leeds area and nationwide!”

SIGN UP TODAY – www.ageuk.org.uk/dash

Race information

Start: Wellington Street, Leeds, LS1 4LT
Date: 16 November
Entry cost: £22 (£20 UKA)
Length: 10km (6.21 miles)
Course: Flat roads, out and back
Start time: 9.30am

World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day is on this coming Friday, the 10th of October. The focus nationally this year is on ‘Living with Schizophrenia’. Throughout the week a variety of groups in Leeds will be doing their bit to raise awareness of ways to improve understanding of mental health issues generally, and about ways to wellbeing for those living with the experience of mental distress.

The third sector organisation Volition will be hosting a celebratory event on  World Mental Health Day itself. from 11 a.m to 3.00 at the Civic Hall in Leeds. This event is jointly organised by Leeds City Council’s, Adult Social Care, Time to Change Leeds and others. That such events are an annual occurrence, when people with lived experience, the public and related organisations can come together to speak openly about mental illness, is a cause for celebration. One aim of this event is a quest for conversation starters, and to help bust stigma, indeed having experience of mental illness is no reason for shame or stigma. Those of us with lived experience of mental distress can be proud of the ways we strive to grapple with symptoms. Our willingness and forthrightness in speaking  out about our experiences can aid others wellbeing.

As we approach the day it is useful to also reflect on this years highlighted theme, ‘Living with Schizophrenia’. What is the impact on individuals who’s symptoms lead to this diagnosis, on those who love and support them and the wider community?

We might also like to consider the Government’s recent report on public mental health, in which the Chief Medical Officer of Health states a commitment to the need for change in addressing stigma. In addition the report also highlights  the need to improve support for people who have lived experience of distressed mental health, to retain or find work. The aforementioned aims are worthy and do require ongoing attention, however as the following excellent article by Mark Gamsu points out, many of the causes of poor mental health are directly attributable to social inequality, the profile of health inequalitiies needs raising. Additionally the article highlights the need for wellbeing initiatives that have already proven effective to be retained, not curtailed.

You are welcome to join in or start a conversation about ways to maintain good mental health.

Sue Margaret

Leeds Kirkgate Market: have your say

Friends of Leeds Kirkgate Market are inviting you to have your say about it’s future. Being empowered to share your opinion is good for your health and the community. Having a say about the future of the city’s planning may have an impact on facilities, and amenities for generations to come. If like me you enjoy the market’s variety of colourful goods and foodstuffs, together with it’s bustling atmosphere, you might be keen to ensure it retains as much of it’s current character as possible. Do Leeds residents need another on trend, more pricey shopping ‘experience’? Many traders have already been priced out of renting stalls, thus depriving shoppers of the variety of goods on which Kirkgate Market built its reputation.

At present Leeds Kirkgate Market, which dates from the mid 19th century, provides an inclusive shopping facility for all Leeds residents and visitors, regardless of their income.  For thousands of years, and world wide, simple lean to trestle boards, covered by awnings, have served as shops. I find an empty market place atmospheric, either at early morning when traders are laying out their wares, or alternatively at dusk when it’s stalls appear forlorn once traders have deserted them. Sometimes I only browse when I visit the market, pausing awhile for a  snack and cuppa. The crepe suzette in the pic was delicious, as was the glass of orange, celery and carrot juice.

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Among the questions Friends of Leeds Kirkgate Market would like you to have your say about are,

“Will these new plans safeguard the Council’s equality duty to the poor and vulnerable, the elderly, the disabled and ethnic minorities?

What do you think about the plans to link the Market to Victoria Gate with a grand entrance on George Street?

Will the butchers and fishmongers be able to occupy the same part of the market?

How do you feel about the 1976 hall being given over to day traders?

Will the outside market survive?”

Whereas an appropriate level of free street entertainment by some wandering minstrel, town cryers or poet,  might be in keeping with market places of old. What do you think about “the Council’s intention to run a constant rolling programme of entertainments? Can you really combine show business with shopping”?

The council will soon be finalizing decisions about what changes will be implemented, if you feel able to support the Friends of Leeds Kirkgate Market campaign, you can follow their blog, where you will find the necessary details to voice your opinion.

Sue

The Reality of Small Differences

Hope you make time to see the Reality of Small Differences  exhibition, of which Gill Crawshaw is a champion! follow on Twitter @Championwonder. Gill comments that the

 

“exhibition is also part of the current Arts Trail in Chapel Allerton (until Sunday 31st August) and is an exhibition of textile art by disabled artists (including people with mental health problems)”,

 

it is currently on display at

Inkwell and Union 105.

Gill adds

“This exhibition came about as a response to the fact that Grayson Perry’s popular tapestry series* is being shown in Leeds in a venue that’s inaccessible to many disabled people.”

 

You can see the Reality of Small Differences exhibition between

10-4 Tuesday – Saturday until Saturday 4th Oct. at Inkwell
and at

East Streets Arts: Union 105 (105 Chapeltown Road LS7 3HY) where it is open

Tuesday 26th – Thursday 28th Aug 12-6pm,

then by appointment the following week until Weds 3rd Sept.

* the Grayson Perry exhibition is currently here in Leeds until the 7th December. Five of Grayson’s six tapestries on display are only accessible by stair or stair climber but here are Temple Newsam’s details about accessibility.